Department of Medicine

About Us

Dedicated to the future of care

The Department of Medicine provides residents with a thorough, broad-based education while giving patients individualized care through Feinberg-affiliated hospitals and care sites and conducting high-level basic and clinical research through our 12 specialized internal medicine divisions.

The unique culture at the Department of Medicine is built on its rich history of research and clinical innovation embedded in an exceptional clinical environment, driven by faculty and staff whose commitment and talent create patient care improvements through scientific advance.

These extraordinary strengths allow the Department to adapt to tremendous challenges and opportunities that are arising in healthcare. We have seen more change over recent years than in many preceding decades. As each of us contributes to expanding what we can achieve, we are driven by the same core mission: Patients First.”

Susan E. Quaggin, MD, FRCP(C), FASN

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What We Do

Faculty Spotlight

Laura Dada

Research Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

The major goal of our research is to study the role of the Na,K-ATPase subunits in the regulation of alveolar epithelial function in normal and hypoxic conditions. We will shift the emphasis from the transport function of the Na,K-ATPase to its important role in stabilizing intercellular junctions and hence in alveolar epithelial integrity. Hypoxemia and injury of the alveolar-capillary barrier might result not only in a decrease in Na,K-ATPase activity but also in weakening interactions between the Na,K-ATPase ß1 subunits in neighboring cells. We will determine the molecular mechanisms regula...

Richard G Wunderink

Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

My research interests revolve around understanding the risk factors, including host genetic risk, and improving outcomes of critically ill patients with serious infections. This includes severe community-acquired pneumonia, sepsis of all causes, and nosocomial infections, particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia.

Linda A Teplin

Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry), Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Linda A. Teplin is the Director of the Health Disparities and Public Policy Program in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She is the Primary Investigator for the Northwestern Project, the first large-scale longitudinal study of mental health needs and outcomes of delinquent youth after detention. For nearly two decades, the Northwestern Project has tracked and re-interviewed nearly 2000 participants, first recruited when they entered the Cook County Temporary Juvenile Detention center when they were ages 10-18 years. The Northwestern Project assesses a broad range of out...

Jacob I Sznajder

Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care) and Cell and Developmental Biology

Asthma, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), Interstitial lung disease

Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman

Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology)

epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus, pregnancy and rheumatic diseases, osteoporosis, steroid-induced osteoporosis, clinical drug trials in lupus

John Pandolfino

Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

Esophageal Disorders, Swallowing Disorders, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Navdeep S Chandel

Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care) and Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

Historically, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been thought to be cellular damaging agents, lacking a physiological function. Accumulation of ROS and oxidative damage have been linked to multiple pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, and premature aging. This guilt by association relationship left a picture of ROS as a necessary evil of oxidative metabolism, a product of an imperfect system. Yet few biological systems possess such flagrant imperfections, thanks to the persistent optimization of evolution, and it appears that oxidative metabolism is no different...

Jeffrey N Savas

Assistant Professor of Neurology (Behavioral Neurology), Medicine (Nephrology and Hypertension) and Pharmacology

My research interests are centered on elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms which drive synaptopathies and proteinopathies in the mammalian nervous system. As a first step, we use reductionist biochemical approaches with discovery-based proteomic analysis to generate unbiased hypothesizes. Next, we test and characterize candidate proteins and pathways for potential functional relevance with molecular approaches. Ultimately, the goal of my research is to identify keystone proteins and proteomes as potential therapeutic targets to hopefully ameliorate neurodevelopmental and degenerative diseases.

Gopi J Astik

Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hospital Medicine)

Clinical documentation, Operations, Quality and Patient Safety

Gary J Martin

Professor of Medicine (General Internal Medicine)

I have enjoyed a wide variety of roles and experiences including: Program Director for the primary care IM residency we established, College Mentor for ~ 40 medical students, class of 2013 and 2017, Director of our M3 primary care clerkship, chaired our faculty group practice IT committee and Ambulatory QA committee, and served 18 years on our faculty group practice board of directors. I have helped implement our EMR across all departments and stay involved in our Enterprise Data Warehouse oversight. Research in cardiovascular disease, medical education and health care delivery have been a foc...